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Market Update  

- By MarketWatch, MarketWatch MarketWatch on Thursday launched the Location Scouts, its latest content initiative, featuring housing-market updates from key cities across the U.S. Location ...


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Health & Lifestyle News  

Studies say 1/3 of young men in China to die from smoking
(AP Photo - Mark Schiefelbein)
From Associated Press
October 08, 2015 9:36 PM EST

BEIJING (AP) — Research published in the medical journal The Lancet says one in three of all the young men in China are likely to die from tobacco, but that the number can fall if the men quit smoking.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Proponents of an effort to repeal California's new stricter law requiring mandatory vaccines for school children failed to submit enough signatures to qualify a ballot initiative asking voters to repeal the law.

FLINT, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder on Thursday called for Flint to switch back to Detroit's water system to address a public health emergency over lead and grapple with broader concerns about the effects of the aging pipes distributing the city's water supply.

When Flint left the Detroit water system last year, it was after years of frustration over the cost and with the anticipation that the city had a cheaper, independent solution.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The founder of a popular form of yoga that is performed in a room heated to more than 100 degrees lost a court appeal Thursday to copyright a sequence of 26 poses and two breathing exercises.

LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says it's worried that millions of doses of polio vaccine might be wasted in Ukraine after a patient group raised concerns that the doses are unsafe.

WEST WINDSOR, N.J. (AP) — A nurse accused of reusing syringes while giving flu shots to 67 patients at a pharmaceutical company voluntarily surrendered her license, New Jersey officials said Thursday.

CHICAGO (AP) — Cancer is much less common in elephants than in humans, even though the big beasts' bodies have many more cells. That's a paradox known among scientists, and now researchers think they may have an explanation — one they say might someday lead to new ways to protect people from cancer.

BOSTON (AP) — Kylee Moriarty has experienced her share of ups and downs since deciding to kick her heroin habit this past summer.

TOKYO (AP) — A new study says children living near the Fukushima nuclear meltdowns have been diagnosed with thyroid cancer at a rate 20 to 50 times that of children elsewhere, a difference the authors contend undermines the government's position that more cases have been discovered in the area only because of stringent monitoring.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Volkswagen plans to withdraw applications seeking U.S. emissions certifications for its 2016 model Jettas, Golfs, Passats and Beetles with diesel engines, raising the possibility that an emissions-rigging device similar to earlier models is also included in its new cars.

LAS VEGAS (AP) — U.S. Sen. Harry Reid is suing a company that makes and markets a flexible exercise band that he says broke or slipped from his hand during an arm-strengthening routine on New Year's Day, causing him to fall and suffer face, rib and eye injuries.

LONDON (AP) — The World Health Organization says there were no Ebola cases reported last week — the first time an entire week has passed without any new confirmed patients since the devastating outbreak began last March.

SAN DIEGO (AP) — It will soon be legal for the terminally ill to end their own lives in the nation's most populous state, and right-to-die advocates expect other states to follow California's example.

WEST WINDSOR, N.J. (AP) — A nurse administering flu shots to dozens of employees of a pharmaceutical company reused syringes, the state Department of Health said Wednesday.

LONDON (AP) — The biggest study ever of women who had ovarian tissue removed, frozen and transplanted suggests the experimental technique is safe and can help about one third of them to have babies.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Government health officials are betting they can adapt the sounds, style and swagger of hip-hop culture to discourage young African Americans, Hispanics and other minority youths from using tobacco.

NEW YORK (AP) — Health officials say more hospitals are encouraging new mothers to breast-feed. A new report found more than two-thirds of hospitals in 2013 helped women start breast-feeding within an hour after birth.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — As late-morning sun streams through narrow prison windows, convicted killer Scott Abram stands beside a fellow inmate, speaks quietly to him and starts singing "Amazing Grace."

BEIJING (AP) — For decades, China has yearned for a Nobel Prize in science. Now, a little-known researcher who helped develop a malaria medicine in a secret military project to assist Vietnam in its war against the U.S.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — In a rare personal message, California's 77-year-old governor provided insight into his deliberations before deciding to sign a bill allowing terminally ill Californians to legally take their own lives, reflecting on religion and self-determination as he weighed an emotionally fraught choice.

Doctors have discovered a potential problem involving implanted heart valves that hundreds of thousands of people have received — they don't always open and close properly, possibly because a blood clot has formed that could raise the risk of stroke.

STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Nobel prize in medicine went Monday to three scientists hailed as "heroes in the truest sense of the word" for saving millions of lives with the creation of the world's leading malaria-fighting drug and another that has nearly wiped out two devastating tropical diseases.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health authorities are ordering manufacturers of specialized medical scopes to study how the reusable devices are cleaned following a series of life-threatening bacterial outbreaks at U.S.